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Characins / Characinae / Black Phantom Tetra

Black Phantom Tetra
Megalamphodus megalopterus


SYN: None
PD: The black dorsal fin is tall and elongated. The body color is smoky-black. A faint black line extends from the gill cover to the tail. The belly is silver. A large black, comma-shaped mark is located behind the gill cover, but it lessens in intensity with age. The anal and pectoral fins are elongated and like the rest of the fins, black in color.
SIZE: To 1.8" (4.5 cm)
SS: None
HAB: Shaded areas with heavy vegetation. South America; in the Rio Guapore, on Bolivia and Brazil border.
S: middle
TANK: 24" (60 cm) or 15 gallons (55 L). A cover of floating plants is needed to diffuse the lighting. Offer shelter with well-planted areas, but leave some open areas for free-swimming.
WATER: pH 6-7.5 (6.8), 4-18 dH (8), 72-82°F (22-28°C)
SB: A peaceful, schooling fish that is recommended for a community tank. This fish can be kept in a pair or groups. Do not keep singly, as single fish lose color, stop eating, and often die. Males may battle, although no injuries occur.
SC: Tetras, Corydoras, Apistogramma, Loricarids, Discus, Colisa.
FOOD: Flake; live; insect larvae, Brine Shrimp, Tubifex.
SEX: Males are slimmer with larger and more elaborate fins. The female has red adipose, pectoral, and anal fins.
B: The pair can be introduced into a breeding tank after separate conditioning. Use a breeding tank with muted light, a pH of 5.5-6.0, and a water hardness of 4 dH. After an impressive courtship, spawning takes place among fine-leafed plants during the morning hours. Eggs hatch in 1-2 days and the fry are free-swimming after 2-4 more. The fry are slow-growing and sometimes difficult to raise. Start feeding with small live foods.
BP: 6. Breeding is not difficult.
R: Fishes of the genus Megalamphodus are very similar to Hyphessobrycon, the only difference being that they have a difference in the skull structure.
DC: 3. This fish is somewhat susceptible to fish tuberculosis, otherwise the Black Phantom Tetra is a hardy fish.


By Rhett Butler   Mongabay.com